Interesting Area Festivals

Interesting Area Festivals

While some annual events are canceled this year and others may be modified, there are still many opportunities to get outside, visit local communities, and experience something fun and different. Below are just a few samples of New England opportunities for an adventure this fall.

On October 2-3 and 9-10, Bedford, Pennsylvania’s Bedford Fall Foliage Festival will feature arts and crafts from over 400 vendors, live music, and kids’ activities, including scarecrow making and horseback riding (Bedfordfallfoliagefestival.com). 

Ocean City, Maryland, will hold its annual Oktoberfest on October 23 and 24 this year with a beach maze, pet parade, “trunk or treat” driving parade, Halloween drive-in movies, and the “Great Pumpkin Race” (OCOceancity.com).

The Sea Witch Festival, held annually for 31 years in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, includes hayrides, vendors, scavenger hunts, a bandstand, a 5K race/walk, and more. The celebration begins on Friday, October 29, and ends on Sunday, the 31st (VisitDelaware.com).

The kickoff for Harvest on the Harbor in Portland, Maine, will be at 5:30 on Friday, November 5. The celebration known as Meet Your Maker will feature members of the Maine Distillers Guild. Participants will sample a wide variety of spirits and foods and have opportunities to meet the distillers. The events on Saturday, November 6, feature two OysterFest sessions allowing participants to sample “the choicest oysters from up and down the coast of Maine,” as well as local beers and sparkling wine (HarvestontheHarbor.com). The link below can connect you with tickets for both events. 

This October, Providence, Rhode Island, will celebrate its 7th annual Ocean State Oyster Festival with live music, craft beers, and opportunities for visitors to learn about local oyster farming (Oysterfestri.com). 

While the fall festivals of New England offer excellent opportunities to build fun new memories, if your time is short, you can do something as simple as taking a walk in the country. The temperate weather and the sights of the changing leaves are sure to help you escape and rejuvenate. 

There’s nothing like the charm and beauty of New England in the fall. Get ready for your next road trip adventure and give Waitte’s Insurance Agency a call to be sure all of your home, auto, and other insurance needs are covered. 

Bedfordfallfoliagefestival.com
CountryLiving.com
HarvestontheHarbor.com
OCOceancity.com
Oysterfestri.com
VisitDelaware.com

National POW/MIA Recognition Day

National POW/MIA Recognition Day

National POW/MIA Recognition Day falls on Friday, September 17 this year. Established in 1979 by then-President Jimmy Carter, the day was first recognized in June but is now held annually on the third Friday in September (Time.com). In 1997, this became one of six days when the POW/MIA flag is displayed in specific locations as required by Congress (Time.com).

The flag that has become a symbol for prisoners of war and service members missing in action was designed by World War II pilot Newt Heisley at the request of Mrs. Mary Hoff, wife of MIA Lieutenant Commander Michael Hoff, in 1971 (militarybenefits.info). It remains the only flag, other than the American flag, to fly above the White House. 

Historically, World War II saw the largest number of POWs at 130,201 captured and 116,129 returned (Americanhistory.si.edu). World War I recorded 4,120 captured and 3,973 returned, with Korea at 7,140 and 4,418, respectively (Americanhistory.si.edu). While Vietnam’s numbers were smaller (726 captured and 661 returned), the American public became much more aware of the plight of captured service members as a result of North Vietnamese propaganda campaigns (Americanhistory.si.edu). Over 1500 who served in Vietnam are still missing in action, and investigation efforts continue (Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency).

Many states will mark National POW/MIA Recognition Day with veterans rallies. The day will also be recognized with ceremonies, and other events at the Pentagon, war memorials, museums, and communities will show support as they gather for organized walks, candlelight vigils, and other events (timeanddate.com; nationaldaycalendar.com). 

As we approach ≈, consider contacting a local veterans organization to ask how you can show honor and support for the sacrifices of those who have served, and recall the mantra of the POW/MIA remembrance movement honoring our nation’s prisoners of war and those who are still missing in action: “You Are Not Forgotten.”

Americanhistory.si.edu 

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency

Militarybenefits.info

Military.com

Nationaldaycalendar.com

Pow-mia families.org

Timeanddate.com

Time.com

Empty Nesters

Empty Nesters

Your kids have been a focal point in your home life and schedule for the past two decades or more. For many of us, however, the physical presence of a child in the home will no longer be part of the equation as the youngest (or in some cases only) child moves on to college, work, or another form of adult independence. 

While empty nest syndrome is not a clinical disorder or diagnosis, the sadness, depression, and loss of purpose that may coincide with the child's departure are very real for many parents (Psychology Today). While we are proud of our children for their increasing independence, the pain felt by parents can be substantial enough that they become “vulnerable to depression, alcoholism, identity crisis, and marital conflicts” (Mayo Clinic). 

Some of the sense of loss can be mitigated by frequent contact with a child through texting, email, or phone calls, though too much “helicopter” parenting can backfire and result in a lower sense of well-being for young adults transitioning to independence (VeryWellFamily.com). “Even if they welcome your guidance and attention, too much checking in and giving direction will hinder your young adult from learning to make good decisions and handle life on their own” (VeryWellFamily.com).

Recommendations for parents include limiting texts, emails, or phone calls to children to once or twice a week and engaging in some self-care. Give some attention to your own diet, sleep habits, exercise, and leisure activities. Now might be a great time to reconnect with old friends or plan a trip with your spouse. Consider taking a class or picking up a new hobby or resume an old activity that you didn’t have time for when your kids dominated your schedule.

Keep in mind that it will get easier. Consider seeking support from friends or colleagues who are going through the same thing or who became empty-nesters within the last few years. Like many big life transitions, you may experience some ups and downs. Still, with time, you may be surprised to enjoy your new role as an advisor rather than a direct caretaker of the wonderful person you have coached into adulthood. “You’ll get used to your child being in charge of their own life, and you can begin to develop a new sense of normal in your life” (VeryWellFamily.com).

At Waitte’s Insurance Agency, we want you to have a smooth transition into this new phase of life. Give us a call when you are ready to discuss your unique insurance needs.

 

Mayo Clinic

Psychology Today

VeryWellFamily.com

History of Labor Day and some Sobering Statistics

History of Labor Day and Some Sobering Statistics

In the late 19th century, labor activists fought for and won their battle for a national holiday recognizing the myriad contributions workers have made to the “strength, prosperity, and well-being” of our great nation (U.S. Department of Labor). Every year since 1894, Americans have celebrated the contributions of our laborers. 

Picnics, parties, parades, and other gatherings are common ways to recognize Labor Day, and for some, unfortunately, drinking and driving has become a part of the ritual. 

Only two days rank higher than Labor Day for the number of fatal automobile accidents (Thanksgiving and Independence Day), and the National Safety Council predicts nearly 400 fatalities of this nature.  The fact that drinking and driving account for roughly one-third of all traffic fatalities in the U.S. indicates that many if not all of these deaths are preventable (Trafficsefetymarketing.gov). 

In addition to fatalities, an estimated 44,000 individuals will incur injuries serious enough to require medical assistance (National Safety Council). 

What can you do to stay safe? There are some options you can exercise to avoid becoming one of the grim statistics. 

  • If you are planning to drink, even if it’s just one alcoholic beverage, designate a sober driver. If a friend who has been drinking is planning to drive, take away the keys and/or find a sober driver for your friend.
  • Stay off the road if possible after dark. The rate of alcohol-impaired drivers more than triples at night compared to daylight hours (Trafficsafetymarketing.gov). 
  • Wear your seatbelt and insist that others in your car do the same. Research indicates that seat belts are 45% effective in preventing fatalities for front-seat car passengers (National Safety Council). If you are in the back seat, buckle up there too. Though some believe that the back seat is safe without a seat belt, the reality is that an unbuckled rider in the rear seat is eight times more likely to be killed or injured in a crash than one who is buckled (Washington Post).

At Waitte’s Insurance Agency, we wish you a happy and safe Labor Day. Give us a call when you are ready to discuss your unique insurance needs. 

National Safety Council
Trafficsafetymarketing.gov
U.S. Department of Labor
United States Department of Transportation "Alcohol-Impaired Driving"
United States Department of Transportation "Safety Facts"
Washington Post