Enjoy the Fall Without Getting Burned

Roasting Marshmallows Over Campfire

Enjoy the Fall Without Getting Burned

As the leaves begin to change and the cooler weather of fall approaches, we renew our appreciation for fire. The warmth of a fire brings with it images of cozy gatherings and good food. Backyard fire pits have grown in popularity over the years and now offer a great way to socialize in relative safety as we can enjoy the company of friends and neighbors and still be outside. Like seemingly all good things, though, fire can be risky.

According to the Journal of Burn and Care Research, “Outdoor fire pits represent an increasing hazard to young children who are particularly susceptible to burn injuries from falls in or around lit recreational fires.” On average, a fire injury occurs every 30 minutes, and each year approximately 3,400 burn injuries become fatal (Burn Statistics). 

While backyard fire pits are one concern, what happens in the kitchen can be even more dangerous. Stanford Children’s Health indicates that home-cooking equipment is the “leading cause of home fires and related injuries.”

While medical research has led to advancements that enable 96.7% of patients treated in burn centers to survive, the consequences of serious burns often include serious scarring and life-long physical disabilities (American Burn Association).

Fortunately, there are steps we can take to help keep our family members and friends safe. Before building or purchasing a backyard fire pit or table, spend some time planning. Your fire should be at least ten feet from your house or a neighbor’s yard. Stay away from overhanging tree branches, fences, or anything else that might burn easily. Before burning, check the wind. If the trees are swaying in the wind, save your fire for another day. Only allow adults to start and maintain a fire, and anyone near the fire should not wear loose clothing. Have a fire extinguisher and first aid kit handy, and keep a close eye on any children. Those under five are especially vulnerable.

There are also steps you can take in the house to significantly reduce the risk of burns. Periodically check appliance chords for damage or fraying; unplug appliances when they are not in use; keep children away from hot liquids, hot oils, or deep fryers; turn pan handles in toward the stove; and check the temperature of bottles, other heated drinks, foods, and bathwater before allowing children access. A kitchen fire extinguisher is also a great idea.  

You can help keep your family, friends, and neighbors safe by avoiding fire hazards and burns. More fire safety and burn prevention tips can be found in our links below. At Waitte’s Insurance Agency, we care about keeping our community members safe because we are part of the community. Our friendly agents look forward to talking with you about your unique insurance needs.

Oxford Journal of Burn and Care Research

Nationwide Children's

HomeAdvisor "Fire Pit Safety Precautions"

Stanford Children's Health 

Stanford Children's Health "Preventing Burn Injuries" 

American Burn Association

Burn Statistics

Teen Drivers: How to Help Keep Them and Our Community Safe

Teen Drivers- How to Help Keep Them and Our Community Safe

Teen Drivers- How to Help Keep Them and Our Community Safe

It is a sobering fact that motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of death for U.S. teens. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), every day about six teens die, and hundreds more are injured in car crashes. Along with the loss of life and pain and suffering also comes a staggering economic cost of accidents involving teen drivers: over $13 billion annually (CDC). 

Why are teen drivers contributing to such grave statistics? Obviously, inexperience plays a role.  Teens are also more likely to speed and/or follow other vehicles too closely.  In addition to these risky habits, teens are the least likely age group to wear seatbelts (CDC). Since research has shown that “seat belts reduce serious crash-related injuries and deaths by about half,” the importance of buckling up cannot be overstated (CDC). While teens cannot legally drink alcohol, many do drink and drive, and intoxication only exacerbates the challenges of operating a motor vehicle for an inexperienced driver. 

As if they don’t already face enough of a challenge to focus on the road, cell phones and other devices may also be competing for teens’ attention and posing further distraction. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, a teen who is texting while driving is 23 times more likely to be involved in a crash than a driver who is not texting.

 

What can you do to help your teen driver stay safe in the face of these daunting statistics? 

  • Model safe driving yourself, especially when your teen is with you. Avoid eating or drinking while driving, and talk to your teen about doing the same.
  • Talk to your teen about the risks of alcohol and other drugs, especially while driving.
  • Make sure your teen is aware of other factors that can compromise a driver’s focus including driving with passengers, driving at night, and driving while drowsy.
  • Stress the importance of wearing a seatbelt, and model by always wearing one yourself.
  • Talk to your teen about the dangers of using a phone while driving. Consider downloading an app to block calls while driving, and ask your teen to do likewise.
  • Make sure you and your teen are both aware of your state’s graduated licensing laws and follow them. These laws have reduced fatalities as well as crashes overall (CDC).
  • Consider utilizing a tracking app that will allow you to view your teen’s location and speed in real-time as well as track your teen’s recent trips on the road, such as Life 360. Tracking basics are free, and additional paid features are also available.

 

While worry is an inherent part of being a parent of a teen, there are steps we can take to reduce the likelihood of serious injuries or even fatalities. At Waitte’s Insurance Agency, we care about the safety of all of the families in our community because we are part of the community. Give us a call when you are ready to talk about your unique insurance needs.

 

For further information, visit the following publication:

CDC "Teen Drivers: Get the Facts"
NHTSA "Teen Driving"
Graduated Licensing Laws

Hit the Road in a Recreational Vehicle

Hit the Road in a Recreational Vehicle

Hit the Road in a Recreational Vehicle

Many of us are thinking about finally taking the vacations that have been on hold for so long, and we might be considering new ways to travel. The assets of recreational vehicles merit their consideration, especially now. An RV allows for a great deal of flexibility--you can go where you want whenever you want. An RV also allows you to avoid the expense, crowds, and hassles of air travel. You can save money by cooking your own food, and when you are ready to head to your next destination, everything is already in the vehicle--no need to pack.  

Seasoned RVers are also quick to point out how friendly people are. If you don't know anyone when you arrive at a campground, you soon will. Another advantage is the view.  While traveling, the RV driver and his or her companion are seated higher off the road than car drivers, and the large windshield offers a broad view of the destination.

RV travel offers a great way to experience the treasures that are our national parks and other great destinations while still enjoying the convenience of a bed and private restroom--go out sightseeing, hiking, biking, or fishing, and return to the convenience of the modern amenities in your RV.  

Drawbacks of traveling by RV include the initial investment of purchasing the RV, the cost of gas, and the challenge of parking.  Consider renting an RV to decide if the investment is right for you, though you may need to plan well ahead. Both sales and rental are significantly up from last year. 

If you do decide to take advantage of the freedom and adventure that come with owning an RV, remember that just like your car, your RV needs to be ensured to be on the road. For more tips about RV travel, destinations, ownership, and rental, check out the links below. For information about insurance, contact locally owned Waitte’s Insurance Agency to discuss your unique insurance needs. Help our community thrive by making sure you, your friends, and your family are covered.

 

For further information, visit the following publication:

AARP "Pros and Cons of Owning an RV"
Tripsavvy "RV Pros and Cons"
National Geographic "Vacationing by RV"

Waitte’s Insurance wishes you and your family a safe and happy Labor Day

Friends drinking spritz at cocktail bar with face masks - New normal friendship concept with happy people having fun together toasting drinks at restaurant - Bright filter with focus on left woman

Waitte's Insurance wants to wish you a safe and Happy Labor Day

On September 5, 1882, ten thousand union workers gathered for a parade in New York City. This event inspired the creation of the official federal Labor Day holiday in 1894. While initially created to celebrate the achievements of the American labor force, Labor Day has also come to symbolize, for us, the end of summer.

While the usual parades may be on hold for this year, many parties and other social events will still take place, and the National Safety Council anticipates between 348 and 452 traffic fatalities. The NSC also estimates that over 45,000 non-fatal injuries will occur due to auto accidents that will be serious enough to need treatment by medical professionals.

Now more than ever, we value our time with family and friends. So how can you enjoy this opportunity to socialize and still protect yourself?  Wear your seatbelt, only ride with a sober driver, and call Waitte’s Insurance to be sure you have the coverage you need before the celebration starts. 

 

For further information, visit the following publications:

NSC Labor Day - Injury Facts

Life is meant to be lived! Get out and enjoy the ride!

POV shot of young man riding on a motorcycle. Hands of motorcyclist on a street

Life is meant to be lived! Get out and enjoy the ride!

For some, the word “bike” conjures up images of childhood and that first delicious spin on two wheels. Many adults recapture this thrill riding a motorcycle. For non-riders, the pull of the bike may be hard to comprehend. What is the draw? Sam Louie, a writer for Psychology Today, describes riding as a way to engage: “You take in what’s around you, using all your senses. You must concentrate all your energy on riding (no texting, eating, etc.).” Louie points out the therapeutic aspect of riding: “Sometimes being alone on the seat of a bike free of distractions can provide the emotional space needed to declutter your soul.” 

Other riders describe this focus as meditative or a feeling of “zen,” as it clears your mind of clutter, including the worries and fears that are especially present with us today and maybe weighing on us more than we realize.

In addition to the freedom, thrill, and zen aspect of riding, there are many practical aspects. Motorcycles are more fuel-efficient than cars, so you will spend less at the pump and pollute less. According to Business Insider, motorcycles are cheaper and easier to maintain than cars, even when including the gear cost.

The thrill of the ride combined with the mental health benefits from being outside and a part of the world in a way car drivers don’t experience (not even you convertible owners), as well as the practical, economic benefits of riding make motorcycles start to sound like the panacea of transportation. Unfortunately, the safety factor is not something we can ignore.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, a motorcycle rider is 28 times as likely to die in a traffic crash as a person in a car. While motorcycles make up approximately three percent of all vehicles on the road, they account for about 14% of fatalities (National Safety Council). How can you enjoy your freedom on the road while taking steps to avoid becoming one of these statistics?

Wear a full-coverage helmet whether your state requires it or not. According to the CDC, helmets reduce the risk of head injury by 69% and the risk of death by 37%. Never drink and ride; stay alert and drive defensively, especially at intersections, where half of all accidents occur. Invest in proper gear: wear durable protective clothing, preferably something reflective, and glasses, goggles, or a face shield that will prevent fogging. Be educated: most states, including Connecticut, require you to pass a motorcycle safety course to operate a two-wheeled motorcycle on the road legally. If it has been a while since you took your course, consider a refresher. Life is meant to be lived! Get out and enjoy the ride! For information about insuring your motorcycle, call Waitte’s Insurance, where our staff is here to discuss your unique insurance needs.

For further information, visit the following publications:

CDC Motorcycle Safety
Motorcycle Safety is a Two-way Street
12 Reasons to Ride a Motorcycle
Motorcycling: Love of the Machine
NHTSA Motorcycle Safety

Schools In. Stay Safe and Drive Safe.

Stop Sign on School Bus

Schools In. Stay Safe and Drive Safe.

Although life as we know it has been met with many changes in recent months, most students will be returning to some sort of school routine in the coming days if they have not already. During a typical school year, 56.6 million children attend an elementary or secondary school in our nation, and of these, an estimated 23.5 million students ride school busses. While not all schools are currently at full capacity, most students will be physically attending during at least part of the week, and this should influence how we behave on the road.

According to Connecticut law, a motorist “must stop for a school bus that is stopped with its red lights flashing whether it is on your side of the road, the opposite side of the road, or at an intersection you are approaching” (DRIVE-SAFELY.net). The exception is if you are traveling toward the bus and the bus is separated from you by a median or other physical roadway barrier. Consequences for failing to follow the law are significant, with the first violation resulting in a fine up to $450. Repeat offenders risk a $500 to $1000 fine and 30 days in jail for every subsequent violation, and motorists risk consequences even if no law officer is present. If a bus driver is able to identify the license plate number, color, and type of vehicle or provide a camera recording the violation along with the date, time, and location, police must issue a warning or summons to the owner of the vehicle cited for illegally passing a school bus (Poole and Gadson).

While these laws may seem strict, they are necessary. Almost three times as many school children die getting on and off the bus as students who die in crashes while riding the bus (Stanford Children’s Health). While the overall fatality rate is low, the loss of any child is a tragedy, especially if there is something we can do to prevent it.

See our links below for more tips to help drivers, parents, and children stay safe. Thinking and planning for the unexpected can help ensure a better tomorrow. To help you prepare for tomorrow, contact Waitte’s Insurance for help with your unique insurance needs.

 

For further information, visit the following publications:

Stanford Children's Health
Connecticut DOT School Bus Safety
CT's Laws and Comparative State Penalties for Illegally Passing a School Bus
School Bus Laws by State

Honest Abe Can Help You Avoid an Accident

How to check tire wear with a penny

Consumers are advised to check tires monthly and replace them when they are too worn. So how can you tell when a tire is no longer roadworthy? Hold a penny with Lincoln’s head facing you upside down. If the top of Lincoln’s head is visible, your tire has less than 2/32” of tread, and it’s time for new tires (NHTSA).  

It is also important to maintain proper tire pressure. Under-inflated tires decrease fuel economy, increase wear on the tires, and can lead to accidents caused by tire separation or blowout.

It is no surprise that usage contributes to tread wear. Less obvious is the impact of time. “As tires age, they are more prone to failure” (NHTSA). It is recommended that automobile owners replace tires every 6-10 years, including the spare.

While monthly checks for proper inflation and tread wear can help you prevent an accident, not every accident can be avoided. Waitte’s Insurance is here for you to prepare for and recover from the unexpected. 

*National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

Safe Driving Practices For Winter Weather Conditions

The winter season is certainly a time of great merriment and celebration. The holidays offer Americans the opportunity to travel around the corner or across the country to be with friends and relatives. However, it is also a time to be even more cautious, primarily when you’re traveling in the icy winter weather conditions.

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration, between the years of 2002 and 2012, there were 211,188 vehicle crashes attributable to snow and sleet. Furthermore, during that same period, 154,580 crashes occurred due to ice on the pavement. Safe driving practices are your insurance for traveling during this joyful yet dangerous time of the year. Read below to find some quick best practices for driving in winter.

-Always watch the weather forecast to learn of the conditions or road closures in your area and where you are traveling. Make preparations to travel before the weather turns ugly and always inform others of your route, destination, and expected time of arrival.
-Keep your fuel tank half full in order to avoid a gas line freeze.
-Never drive while sleepy. Stay alert to both the weather conditions and the actions of the drivers on the road with you.
-Always steer into a skid.
-Keep your windshield clean to increase visibilty.
-Always wear a seat belt.
-Be sure your automobile is appropriate for the weather conditions in which you will be driving. Properly maintenance your vehicle for optimum performance.
-Get a winter survival kit for your vehicle which may include a flashlight and spare batteries, canned food, snack bars, medications, water, a cellphone charger, and a red bandana or cloth.

If you can avoid driving, stay home until the worst of a winter storm has passed. Be sure you are prepared for incidents that may occur to your vehicle without driving. Don’t let winter weather conditions get the best of you. Practice these safe driving tips in the snow and ice.

An icy branch fall on your car? Does your autombile insurance cover this? Contact your insurer to confirm that you are prepared for the tough winter season.

Knowing the Factors that Determine Your Car Insurance Premium

You may be the world’s safest driver, yet your car insurance premium rates are higher due to factors you can’t control. Is this fair? No, but it’s reality that most insurance companies use various parameters to set their rates for auto insurance.

Understanding each factor that determines coverage rates in Connecticut and elsewhere can give you a leg up when it comes to finding the best policy.

Marital status, age and gender

Rates reflect the fact that older drivers typically are involved in fewer accidents. Women also have fewer accidents, and their rates reflect it. Statistics show that single people are more likely than married individuals to be in a wreck, so singletons pay more.

Location and driving consistency

The area where you live determines in part your car insurance premium rates. Higher rates of property crimes can increase your rates. Of course, your rates also will be higher if you routinely drive long distances.

Credit score

Studies show credit scores to be useful in determining the chances of insurance claims. Payment history, bankruptcies and debt levels all play a part in insurance rate calculations.

Driving record

Speeding tickets, DUIs and accidents all raise your coverage rates. Locals of Norwich, and drivers throughout the entire state of Connecticut, should note that all information related to a DUI stays on your record for a decade, and your insurance company may check your record at any time. Experts note that your rates likely will increase by 20 to 60 percent after a DUI, or your policy may be canceled.

Type of car

The value of your car and its safety record also helps determine your rates. Knowing the deciding factors that go into setting car insurance premium rates, and working to control what you can, will save you money in the long run.  Whether that’s driving a less-expensive vehicle, reducing your speed or moving to a lower-crime area, the savings add up.

Are you unsure as to how your driving record or any of these factors will impact your insurance premium? Let Waitte’s Insurance Agency calculate an insurance rate that is best suited for you. For a free rate quote, Click Here!

Essentials in Preparing Your Motorcycle for Scenic Connecticut Roads

The Winter winds are finally subsiding and the warm open road is waiting for you to get out and ride! But after leaving your ride in storage for the Winter, it’s important when preparing your motorcycle to check all of your safety equipment and review the laws and regulations to ensure your next road trip ends safely.

Motorcycle Laws and Regulations in CT

There are some important motorcycle safety regulations to keep in mind before you take yours out on the Connecticut roads. Eye protection is mandatory unless your vehicle has a windscreen, and if your bike was manufactured after 1980, daytime headlight use is required. Also, remember that riding two abreast in one lane is prohibited.

Licensing Courses

The Connecticut Rider Education Program for Motorcycle Safety offers four skill levels of courses which are available to all riders. You may also be eligible for a 10% discount on your motorcycle insurance policy by completing a rider education course in Connecticut.

Equipment Requirements

Although Connecticut law does not require motorcycle operators over the age of 18 to wear a helmet, doing so is one of the most crucial steps you can take to ensure your safety! According to state motorcycle accident statistics, in more than two-thirds of fatal motorcycle crashes the driver wasn’t wearing a helmet. Don’t skip this simple and essential step! Other requirements in Connecticut include having at least one rear-view mirror and a properly functioning muffler.

Restrictions for Riders Under 18

Riders under the age of 18 years old MUST wear a helmet at all times and are also required to complete a rider education course.

Insurance Requirements

Before you bask in the Spring sunshine, take the time to review your motorcycle insurance policy to make any necessary updates. A compulsory liability insurance policy is the minimum requirement in the state of Connecticut.

Does your current motorcycle insurance policy need to be reviewed or updated? Before you begin preparing your motorcycle for the beauty that New England has to offer during the Spring, contact Waitte’s Insurance Agency today and receive a premium quote!